Connect with us

Exclusive

Scranton Coach Accused of Bullying Opens Up, Says Parents May Be Seeking Revenge

Published

on

What seemingly started as a favor for a friend became an anti-bullying statement impetuously propagated around the region. Kathy Welby White shared a video April 27 on Facebook with a captioned slide of notes alleging a Scranton, Pennsylvania, high school baseball coach and gym teacher, George “Skip” Roskos, is a racist bully who picks on kids in Special Ed. Now suspended from coaching as his school district investigates, Roskos opened up to Better than the Weekend in a new interview.

I have shared this for a freind-YOU DID THIS SCRANTON SCHOOL DISTRICT!!!!! YOU WERE AWARE AND I HAVE PROOF!!! YOU LET THIS MAN HURT WAY WAY TOO MANY CHILDREN!!!! STOP THE HURT!!!!!! #stopthebullyatwshs

Posted by Kathy Welby White on Friday, April 27, 2018

The video claims to be anonymously produced by a student at West Scranton High who intensely fears Roskos and the influence it would have on the rest of their school experience if their identity was known. But there may be more to this story. Roskos says he knows the woman who posted the video. He identified her as the mom of a student he cut from his baseball team.

The court of public opinion weighed in as the video was watched roughly 40,000 times. Ghosts of Coach Roskos past have been creeping up on him over social media like a porn star who slept with a president.

Similar to Sarah Huckabee Sanders’ bulldog demeanor in a White House press briefing, some are blazing forward and going to bat in defense of the coach. 

 

The claims show a lot at stake. Either a child’s welfare is in jeopardy by a racist bully abusing their power or a coach with an unhinged enemy is at risk of losing their job and having their reputation ravaged by the trolls of Facebook.

Either way, everyone seems to be dropping the ball on this.

While Roskos is suspended from coaching duties, West Scranton High is still allowing him to teach gym class at the school. Shame on school officials for allowing someone who is being investigated for bullying students and possibly making racist remarks to even be around the kids on school property until the investigation is complete.

Rosemary Boland, president of the Scranton Federation of Teachers, told a Scranton newspaper she doesn’t give the video much credence since it was made anonymously. If a student fears the consequences of holding an educator accountable for abusing their power, and wants to remain anonymous out of terror, they should have the right to have their claims taken seriously during an investigation. Shame on her for publicly abandoning the welfare of a child and not stepping down from her position once her feelings were reported by the news.

A Scranton newspaper reported the story and quoted the coach only twice in the article, one quote being: “False, false, false,” on his response to the allegations. That’s elementary reporting that shouldn’t even be accepted by an intern. The community deserves better reporting. The taxpayers funding the educators salaries deserve more thought-out questions to be asked that result in more answers.

Countless people are ripping Roskos a new asshole online. If you’re going to defend a child for being bullied and hold the accused accountable, don’t be a bully and make fun of someone’s weight and alleged fast food obsession. Demand action. Encourage the student to come forward and show them you’ll have their back. Unless a victim comes forward, the claims are just rumors.  Should rumors on social media have the power to ruin someone’s life? If that’s the case, you can say anything you want about someone you don’t like and ruin their life. That’s just fucked up.

Better than the Weekend reached out to both Kathy Welby White and Coach Roskos to further share their stories. Roskos is the only one who agreed to be interviewed. This is what he had to say:

What do you most enjoy about coaching? The interactions and relationships you can develop with teenage players while also having the opportunity to be competitive in a game that’s been part of my life basically since I was born. 

The video was posted by Kathy Welby White. Do do you know her? Yes. Mrs. White’s son tried out for our team a few years ago and he was not selected. I believe he graduated from West Scranton High School in 2014. 

Have you experienced retaliation from a student or parent when having to cut someone from the team in the past? Several times. This example here with the recent Facebook video. In the video, the creator of it, if the creator is being honest, he said he played from T-Ball through junior varsity. I guess my assumption is the video is made by someone who wasn’t selected for the varsity team so he chose to make this video. Or it’s possible it could be parents of a student who may have been cut. Parents usually react more strongly than the young men. 

After the video surfaced, did you take a moment to self-reflect and think, ‘Hey, maybe I went too far? Maybe I hurt a kids feelings and made them feel uncomfortable without realizing’? I do that type of self-reflection all the time with students in my classes and students on our teams. 

I’m specifically asking about when you saw this video. Did you self-reflect on your actions or did you instantly discredit the allegations? I probably did both. I know it’s false, but I also thought through some past interactions and also talked to the people who are closest to me on a daily basis.

You’ve described your coaching style as being ‘direct.’ What is an example of something you say in your direct coaching style to motivate your team? That we need to be better. That we need to look at different ways to be more competitive. 

Do you tell students they need to be better calmly or aggressively? I’m always calm.

Does a calm tone really motivate kids to win a game? Do my tones change if we’re in a game or at a practice? Definitely. 

Have you ever called them pussies? No.

Did ever tell an athlete they should be fast because of the color of their skin? No.

Do you think today’s youth is too sensitive? I actually think kids, for the most part, are the same in 2018 as they were when I started coaching in 1996. I think kids wants to be challenged and want to be successful. I think parents have changed a great deal. Social media is a big part of that. Twenty-two years ago, if a coach told somebody at practice something they didn’t like, they’d go home and blow off a little steam to their parents. If their parents wanted to blow off steam to another parent, they’d have to call them on the phone. That person would have to be home to answer and then they’d have a discussion. Now someone can post something on Facebook, and tens of thousands of people can see it in minutes and it spreads a lot more quickly. 

How has the attention impacted you? It’s hurtful to see that people have written negative things about me; about members of my family. 

Have you cried? No.

Do you think you’re approachable to a student who may feel bullied in school? Yeah. I’ve been confided in dozens of times from students in my class to players on the team. 

Being a teacher and coach in the digital age, when students have their phones with them and can express their feelings toward you for the world to see on social media, does that make your job more challenging? I’ve never thought about that. I just haven’t.

Do you think it’s appropriate for a coach to yell at an athlete to motivate them? Sure.

Do you think it’s appropriate for a coach to tell an athlete they aren’t good enough and could be better? Depends on the situation, but usually, yes. 

Has your behavior ever negatively impacted your coaching career? All my interactions are working toward a place of positivity with the team toward a common goal of developing competitive young men and trying to win games.

Yes or no, has your behavior ever impacted your coaching career? No.

Can you explain this picture circulating on Facebook?  

Facebook

Roskos: I held two positions with the American Legion. I was told I had to resign one or the other. It was left to me which position I wanted to keep and which position I wanted to resign. I told him I wouldn’t resign either, but he could choose if he wanted to basically fire me as regional director. And essentially, that’s what he did, but he also removed me from my coaching position.

Why did they remove you from both? If you read the letter, you’d see there’s no specific charge in there.

So, if you had resigned from one of the positions, you wouldn’t have that cease and desist notice? Yes. That’s what I was told in advance of getting that letter. 

Is it hard for you to walk into school every day with your head up while it’s public that you’re being investigated for allegedly bullying a student and making racist remarks? It doesn’t affect me from doing my job because I’m a professional. One of the things I, and other high school coaches, often teach our kids is that regardless of what goes wrong we have to bounce back and still do our job. 

The invitation for Kathy Welby White to share her side of the story still stands.

To the student who made these claims: You’re invited to share your story and be acknowledged.

Exclusive

Scranton Women in Power

Published

on

Photographed by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018 | Styled by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Bow down, gentlemen. Women on top in the Electric City are being seen and heard without asking permission to make their mark. And It’s about damn time.

GIPHY

You’d have to be trapped in a cave with a soccer team in Thailand to not notice the new wave of feminism surging across the country. Female empowerment isn’t only the object of cultural discourse these days, but overdue action. Women are now believed when they speak up against sexual misconduct in the workplace. Between Congressional and state-level races, more than 2,000 women are running for office right now. They’re single mothers, veterans, athletes, refugees, Democrats, and Republicans.

Still, you could be living on the streets of Lackawanna Ave. eavesdropping every conversation and likely overhear more comments about peeing in a cup by court order than praise for the influence of women breaking barriers for future generations — which makes me wonder: Why the hell isn’t anyone talking about the city’s strong women?

We know about Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez, the youngest woman elected to Congress last June. But what about Jessica Eskra, the youngest female city solicitor of Scranton? She’s blazing the trail for local millennials to be in positions of power.

Maggie Timoney made news when becoming the first female CEO of a major American beer company this summer (Heineken USA). But where was the regional attention when Jennifer Warnetsky became the general manager of the Marketplace at Steamtown and Scranton Public Market? It’s probably only one of the biggest business developments in the city.

Tech firms such as Facebook captured headlines for offering benefits to pay for women to freeze their eggs for inspiration to focus on their careers, but where was the pat on the back for Jessica Kalinoski, Director of Operations at Admiral Management Group, who manages such properties as the Connell Building, The Leonard and Montage Mountain Ski Resort and Water Park? Kalinoski’s efforts to accommodate working mothers who don’t delay starting a family should be revered. A mother of four, Kalinsoki let’s her employees bring their kids to work if needed. “I hired a woman who was 7 months pregnant,” Kalinoski told Better than the Weekend. “She was worried she wasn’t going to be able to find a job. But I hired her. I felt she was the best person for the job. I told her we’d figure it out. She ended up having the baby 11 days later. She came to work when she could.”

Since nobody seems to be having the conversation loudly enough, Better than the Weekend decided to spend an afternoon with some of the city’s women in power — in areas such as education, philanthropy, business and entrepreneurship — at the historic Scranton Cultural Center to find out where they feel Scranton stands in this cultural movement. Oh, and to recognize their groundbreaking leadership.

Dr. Alexis Kirijan

(First Female) Superintendent of Schools in Scranton

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018

Have you ever felt you had to work harder because you’re a woman? I grew up in this area. I grew up in this school district. I graduated high school in 1966. You have to start thinking about what the world was like in 1966. That was the time when women were really trying to fight for their rights. There were movements with women like Gloria Steinem. Women were looking to be equal to men in the workplace and in general in society. For me, to get in the position I am in now, I’ve had to work very hard and get as much education as possible to reach this pinnacle. I am the first woman superintendent in this school district and this school district has been around a long time. The concept was always that a superintendent role was a place for a man and women would serve in other roles that served the superintendent. There were many times when I was more qualified than a man who got a promotion. It made me realize I had to work harder. I had to be more educated. I had to be willing to accept less in the workplace to get where I finally wanted to be.

Is there a message you want students in your district to understand about the power of women? In the past, science, technology, engineering and math seemed to be something males were better in and women or girls were not involved in as much. What we’re doing in our district, is we’re getting girls involved in STEM education. For our 7th grade students, we have what we call the Salvadori STEM program and it’s funded by the Scranton Area Community Foundation. But a piece we’ve added to that through the Women in Philanthropy in this area is a STEM education club for girls in our schools. We have women who are involved in science, technology, engineering and math professions come talk to the students. It’s a way for girls to have other women to look up to and know there are other possibilities for them as they’re growing up and deciding what they want to do. It’s a way for our students, girls and boys, to see women can grow up to do anything.

Did you ever think you’d be superintendent? This goal was 50 years in the making. When I was in high school, my goal one day was to be the superintendent of a high school. I was strongly influenced by the male principal and assistant principal in my high school, Scranton High School. I wanted to understand how this machine was running. I did an internship in the principals office when I was in high school. That really kicked me off in education. I always had the goal of being a superintendent. You can imagine the joy I had when Judge Munley had me raise my right hand and take the oath of superintendent — and while I was next to my husband, who I met when I was 18 years old, who had supported me all of my career. It was such a feeling of accomplishment. I feel like I’m doing my life’s work here. I never gave up. I think the secret to perseverance is finding something you can see in your future that is meaningful to you.

How do you define a powerful woman? Smart. Educated. There’s a difference between being smart and educated. I think you need both.

Charlene DellaValle

General Manager of Crunch

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018 | Styled by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Have you ever felt you had to work harder because you’re a woman? I struggle to be taken seriously every single day. I’ll explain a policy to someone and they’ll think I’m being rude. My husband also works with me. Sometimes I’ll have to grab him to explain something. When he’ll explain the same policy in the same tone, people will respect it. It’s ridiculous. As a woman, I’ve found I have to work harder on my delivery to come across softer because as a female I can be mistaken as being a bitch instead of just being serious. When a guy has a serious tone, it’s expected and accepted.

Do you think Scranton is above the curve or behind the times when it comes to gender equality? When I first got to Scranton, I had trouble with people taking me seriously in the community as a woman. But then I met people like John Basalyga, who owns the Marketplace, who believes in people for their work ethic whether they’re male or female. I’ve watched John deal with a lot of women in his group. It seems like I’m seeing a lot of women in management in these stores here at the Marketplace. The general manager of the Marketplace is a woman. When I go to events with the Chamber of Commerce, there’s a lot of women there. I think things are moving in the right direction.

Who’s a powerful woman you look up to? Someone I look up to right now is Mari Potis with the Scranton Chamber of Commerce. I’m not originally from this community. She has guided me through the hardships I have come across being new to the community. She has given me great advice. I really look up to her and what she’s doing for the community.

How do you define a powerful woman? Strong. A powerful woman can look someone in the eyes and admit when they’re wrong, but also feel confident to say, ‘Hey, I’m right, and you need to accept it.’

Nicole Morristell

Director of Leadership Lackawanna

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018 | Styled by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Have you ever felt you had to work harder because you’re a woman? In general, young females have to work very hard. We have to prove ourselves more than men. I don’t think men have as hard of a time proving themselves in our community. Men in our community will take other men under their wing and parade them around. We don’t see powerful women with an entourage of young females being paraded around like you do with the men in our community. The opportunity isn’t right for women to do it, because they’re working so much harder to have to prove themselves.

Do you think Scranton is above the curve or behind the times when it comes to gender equality? The people that have roles of power in Scranton are from families or positions where they already had power, influence or recognition. The rich get richer and the poor get poorer. If you’re not already known and established in Scranton, it takes you a long time to break into the community and establish yourself. Our strong traditions is why Scranton is behind the times in general, including gender equality. I absolutely love some of our traditions, so I feel torn saying this, but it’s holding Scranton back because it’s preventing new blood from coming in and contributing.

Strides have been made in the current women’s rights movement — but what still needs to be done? The Chamber of Commerce gives a Woman of Excellence award every year. We have a very hard time getting women to apply for that award because they don’t want to brag about themselves. It bothers me we have to convince women to apply for an award. There’s no shame in a woman admitting her own strengths and recognizing that they’re great at something. The more women that are in the public eye, the better it would be for all of the women in the community.

How do you define a powerful woman? A suit and shoulder pads.

Kristen Shemanski

Vice-Chair of Leadership Lackawanna

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018 | Styled by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Have you ever felt you had to work harder because you’re a woman? I have to monitor my behavior more than men have to. If women are too soft, they’re a delicate flower. If we’re too stern, we’re a bitch and people won’t work with us. Women have to constantly think before they speak just because they’re a woman and their behavior will be judged more harshly than a man’s.

Is there a message you want young women to understand about the power of women? Women can do anything. I’m not married. I don’t have kids. I have absolutely no desire to ever have children. And there’s nothing wrong with that. Looking back at my parents’ generation, my mom was married at like 18 or 19.

Strides have been made in the current women’s rights movement — but what still needs to be done? We need to take our beliefs off social media. We can say we want gender equality and more women in office, but nobody around here is acting on those beliefs.

How do you define a powerful woman? A powerful woman is a woman who isn’t afraid to pat themselves on the back and give themselves the credit they deserve, whether they’re a stay-at-home mom or a businesswoman.

Kari Johnson

Owner of AOS Metals

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018 | Styled by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Do you think Scranton is above the curve or behind the times when it comes to gender equality? Scranton is making huge strides in the improvement for success of women in business. I’m a prime example. I took all the free classes and went to all the meetings the Women’s Entrepreneurship Center had to offer. I was a successful graduate of their 6 week startup program and they stayed with me every step of the way and were there to help me celebrate when I opened the doors to my store.

Who’s a powerful woman you look up to? Meegan Possemato. She’s the co-owner of ON & ON. I know I never would have been able to start my own business in a downtown storefront without her. Meegan is an inspiration to be around and has helped me make important business decisions. I see her do the same for many people that come across her path. I admire women who uplift and support each other. I’ve seen it firsthand in Scranton at the Entrepreneurship Center and Women in Philanthropy. The best way to success is having a great support system that’ll help you stay sane in the face of doubt.

Have you ever felt you had to work harder because you’re a woman? I have been blessed that I never felt being a female held me back from anything. When people find out I’m a metalsmith, most people think it’s badass. But recently, I was disappointed when I saw the local news station show a segment talking about a high school football dinner where I basically learned who works out with who. Meanwhile, the Tunkannock Softball Team was one game away from a regional title that would send them to the Little League World Series and there was no coverage at all. Now they’re finally getting the coverage from the news, but it took an army of people to stand up and say something. It’s heartbreaking to see girls have to fight harder to be recognized. It’s heartbreaking to see anyone have to fighter harder to feel equal.

 

Gowns for Charlene DellaValle, Nicole Morristell, Kristen Shemanski and Kari Johnson were provided by Elegant Bridal & Boutique

Photography by Lisa Petz, Better than the Weekend, August 2018

 

Continue Reading

Exclusive

20 Questions with NFL QB Matt McGloin

Published

on

Photo Courtesy Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament

Matt McGloin is a hero in his hometown of Scranton, Pennsylvania — and not just because he went on to become a starting quarterback for Penn State who made it to the NFL. The Kansas City Chiefs QB isn’t forgetting his roots. McGloin is using his platform to raise money with an annual charity event focused on improving the lives of people in need throughout Northeastern PA, a region that could greatly benefit from the influence of an idol beyond the legendary Michael Scott and sea of The Office GIF’s circulating the internet.

The third annual Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament will tee off Sunday, July 16.  Better than the Weekend played a game of 20 Questions with the QB before the event.

What inspired you to launch this event? My father was president of Lackawanna Little League for a long time. Him and my mom were always raising money for the little league. I grew up watching them help raise money and help out in any way they could. I always knew I’d do something like that, too. And Scranton is where I grew up. The area is important to me. I want to help make the community stronger.

Can people still register? Yes. Absolutely. They can visit the Facebook page or call 570-604-3315.

How much money has your charity raised so far? Almost $40,000.

When you’re not in season, what do you miss most about the city of Scranton? The food.

Who has the best pizza in Scranton? Maroni’s.

Who has the best wings in Scranton? Rep’s.

Where’s your favorite place to hang out in Scranton? At home with family and friends.

A Scranton coach was accused recently of bullying his players, igniting a debate of how tough a coach should be on a student athlete. What coaching style did you experience as a student and how did it impact you? I think what it comes down to as a coach, and I can say this because as a quarterback you’re somewhat a coach on the field, there’s a different way to talk to everybody. As a coach, you need to understand that. Not everybody has the same attitude. Not everybody has the same personality. You may be able to yell at one guy and it may help him get the job done after you yell at him but the other guy may not respond in the right way to that. You have to know how to talk to them to get the best out of them. It’s a coaches responsibility to take the time to learn about each and every one of the players and how they respond to coaching. At the end of the day, we’re all there to win.

What’s the best advice you ever got? My mom always told me to have no regrets. That would be the best advice I ever got.

What advice would you give your 18-year-old self? I’d tell myself there’s gonna be good days and there’s gonna be bad days, but everything is gonna be alright and I’m gonna get through it.

Photo Courtest Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament

What advice would you give student athletes who dream of going pro? You have to make sacrifices. You gotta get your practice in. Maybe you might not be able to go to the beach for a week. Maybe you can only go for two days. But making sacrifices is something you need to know and be willing to accept.

If you weren’t playing football, what would you be doing? Well, I have a degree in broadcast journalism. I think I’d like to be a sports analyst. Sports in general have always been a big part of my life. Growing up, I went baseball, football, basketball, right in a row. Non-stop.

Photo Courtesy Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament

What’s something people might be surprised to know about you? I’m pretty low-key. When I get some free time, I enjoy it. I like to sit on the couch and watch movies and take my dog for walks.

Liquor or beer? Beer. Anything Sam Adams.

What’s something every guy should try at least once in his life? Travel the world.

Football players have been under a lot of scrutiny by taking a knee. Reactions ranged from support to open contempt from President Trump and the NFL ultimately banning the act of protest. Do you support the right to take the knee or do you stand with the NFL’s decision?  I stand for the National Anthem. I’ve never taken a knee and I never would take a knee. Personally, I don’t think politics should be involved in sports. I have a job to do. I’m part of the Kansas City Chiefs. I will do what I’m told to do. That’s what I believe in.

McGloin was named the most outstanding walk-on player in the country in 2012. | Photo Courtesy Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament

What’s your favorite quote? ‘Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.’

How has the money raised from your charity been used to help people in Northeastern PA? The whole idea of the charity is to keep all of the money donated in Northeastern Pennsylvania. We helped provide medical assistance to a young kid that had cancer. We threw a Christmas brunch and gave gifts to 180 veterans at the Gino Merli Veterans Center. We handed out over 400 turkeys to families around the holidays. We helped provide dental care services for more than 7,000 underprivileged children in the community. And we’re just getting started.

Photo Courtesy Matt McGloin Charity Golf Tournament

Where is the event taking place? Glen Oak Country Club in Clarks Summit.

What helps you get through the week? I want to earn my days off. I work extremely hard during the week in the weight room, conditioning, throwing the football, doing workouts, studying the playbook, stuff like that, so I can feel like I earned my time off on Saturday and Sunday. There’s something about that sense of satisfaction from knowing you had a great lift this week or a great throwing session and feeling like you worked really hard during the week.

For more information on the golf tournament, click right here and head over to the official Facebook page

Something is wrong.
Instagram token error.
Load More

Continue Reading

Exclusive

‘I served in the Armed Forces, stop assuming we all have PTSD’

Earl Granville

Published

on

My name is Earl. I’m a retired solider of the U.S. Army. I lost my leg in June 2008 from a roadside bomb while leaving a site to build a school in a village in Afghanistan. Now please stop assuming I have PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder).

When it comes to our Armed Forces, society assumes we all have PTSD. Once, an organization asked if I wanted to go on a hunting trip. The person on the other line said: “We can help you with your PTSD.” I then asked: “What makes you automatically assume I have PTSD?”

There was some awkward silence.

Needless to say, I didn’t go on that hunting trip. Hunting was never really my thing anyway.

Now do I acknowledge that PTSD is a real problem that affects many of our Armed Forces? Absolutely. However, part of raising awareness around post-traumatic stress disorder is helping people realize that it’s not just a military issue. I truly am humbled the way society looks after our Armed Forces now compared to 40 years ago. I just wish people would stop putting a blanket over us and assume we’re all the same. PTSD is obviously real, but anybody can struggle with thoughts of past experiences, not just our Armed Forces community.

There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t think about the day I lost my leg. I remember gaining consciousness after being knocked out only momentarily. I remember two MEDEVAC choppers coming — one to carry me and an Afghan governor and another to carry the remains of my comrades SPC Derek Holland and MAJ Scott Hagerty. I remember thinking my life was going to end.

Personally, I stopped letting it control my life.

I stopped labeling myself as a victim and looked for a new purpose after the uniform came off. I started challenging my amputation with more and more goals I’d make for myself, even some that were included in honor of Derek, Scott, and my late twin brother, Army SSG Joe Granville, who took his own life in 2010. It started to take my mind off of the adversities that happened in my life, and eventually I started helping those in situations similar to mine and assisting them in reaching their goals.

To my brothers & sisters in arms: All I ask of you is to take off the Dysfunctional Veteran shirt and move forward and continue to be something great. Don’t let the dark days define the rest of your life. Step out of your comfort zone, filter out the bad in your life, and be a part of something that makes a difference again, just like you once did in uniform.

The Armed Forces culture taught us to be a warrior, and some of that training and experience, good or bad, will stick with us for the rest of our lives. Remember, no matter what you experienced, the world doesn’t owe us anything. Put the self-ego away, be prideful of that small, but possibly heavy time in your life, and continue to have that Warrior Spirit and understand if that heavy plate still holds you down, you don’t have to carry it alone. Whether it’s from a professional or a close friend, you know you don’t have to hold it by yourself.

As society, military or not, we should all carry that weight together. We’re human; and as humans we are going to face heavy times in our lives, military or not.

Earl Granville is a nine-year veteran as an infantryman in the Army National Guard, with two combat deployments and one peace keeping. He is retired holding the rank of Staff Sergeant with awards such as Bronze Star, Purple Heart and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He is a graduate of Lackawanna College and working on his undergrad at the University of Scranton. He travels the country as a public speaker discussing healthy ways to battle adversity and continuing to find a purpose after a door closes. Earl is a team member for the military non profits Operation Enduring Warrior and Oscar Mike. Follow his journey on Facebook. 

Continue Reading

Most Popular