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Trump’s travel ban is allowed to take partial effect

Reuters

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Reuters

A U.S. appeals court in California on Monday let President Donald Trump’s latest travel ban go partially into effect, ruling the government can bar entry of people from six Muslim-majority countries with no connections to the United States.

A three-judge panel of the San Francisco-based 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals partially granted a Trump administration request to block at least temporarily a judge’s ruling that had put the new ban on hold. Trump’s ban was announced on Sept. 24 and replaced two previous versions that had been impeded by federal courts.

Reuters

The action means the ban will apply to people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia and Chad who do not have connections to the United States.

Those connections are defined as family relationships and “formal, documented” relationships with U.S.-based entities such as universities and resettlement agencies. Those with family relationships that would allow entry include grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins of people in the United States.

The ruling does not affect people from the two other countries listed in Trump’s ban, North Korea and Venezuela.

The state of Hawaii, which sued to block the restrictions, argued that federal immigration law did not give Trump the authority to impose them on six of those countries. U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson in Honolulu ruled last month that Hawaii was likely to succeed with that argument.

Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin said the court’s decision tracked what the Supreme Court said in June when it partially revived Trump’s second travel ban, which has now expired.

“I’m pleased that family ties to the U.S., including grandparents, will be respected,” Chin added.

Trump issued his first travel ban targeting several Muslim-majority countries in January, just a week after he took office, and then issued a revised one after the first was blocked by the courts. The second one expired in September after a long court fight and was replaced with another revised version.

Trump has said the travel ban is needed to protect the United States from terrorism by Muslim militants. As a candidate, Trump had promised “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.”

Critics of the travel ban in its various iterations call it a “Muslim ban” that violates the U.S. Constitution by discriminating on the basis of religion.

The 9th Circuit is due to hear oral arguments in the case on Dec. 6. In a parallel case from Maryland, a judge also ruled against the Trump administration and partially blocked the ban from going into effect.

An appeal in the Maryland case is being heard on Dec. 8 by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia. The Maryland case was brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, which represents several advocacy groups, including the International Refugee Assistance Project.

In announcing the newest travel restrictions, the White House had portrayed them as necessary consequences for countries that did not meet new requirements for vetting of immigrants and issuing of visas. Those requirements were shared in July with foreign governments, which had 50 days to make improvements if needed, the White House said.

A number of countries made improvements by enhancing the security of travel documents or the reporting of passports that were lost or stolen, the administration has said. Others did not, sparking the restrictions.

The Justice Department had no immediate comment.

 

 

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)

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Meghan Markle Fought Against a Sexist TV Ad When She Was 11 – and Won

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Meghan Markle has the world’s attention.

The American-born actress set to marry Prince Harry in May 2018 has a future of fulfilling philanthropic duties — and maybe even tea parties with the Queen every now and then — to look forward to.

A throwback video of an 11-year-old Markle on a 1993 episode of a Nickelodeon news show, however, proves the future royal was always fit to be a princess fighting for rights of the people.

When watching TV commercials with her classmates and assessing potentially implicit messages for a social studies project, Markle’s spirit for advocacy kicked in. She was disturbed how an ad for dishwashing detergent implied women do all the cleaning.

“I don’t think it’s right for kids to grow up thinking these things — that just Mom does everything,” a young Markle says in the video clip. “It’s always ‘Mom does this,’ and ‘Mom does that.’”

She went on to make a small impact by writing a letter to Proctor & Gamble, which resulted in the company changing the voice-over in the ad to declare “people” were battling to clean instead of women.

The 36-year-old now has a much bigger stage to speak from, which is great news in the fight for equality.

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U.S. Military Ruled to Accept Transgender Recruits Starting January 1st

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A federal judge ruled Monday (Dec. 11) against President Trump’s transphobic agenda to ban transgender people from serving in the military.

Sarah Kate Ellis, President and CEO of GLAAD released a statement following the triumph for trans rights.

“Today’s legal victory is the latest step towards preventing Trump’s bigoted trans military ban from ever going into full effect,” she said. “The Trump administration is struggling to provide any evidence that open trans enlistment be must be delayed because none exists beyond their own hate-fueled anti-LGBTQ agenda.”

Earlier this year, Trump implied trans-related health expenses were a financial burden on the military, even though reports proved trans-related costs make up 0.04 to 0.12 percent of the military’s annual health care expenditures.

For now, the military must start taking trans recruits on January 1.

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Charles Manson is really f*#$ing dead

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Charles Manson, the nefarious leader of the Manson Family cult that slaughtered seven people in 1969, is dead. He’s really fucking dead. Manson was 83 years old.

Debra Tate, sister of Manson’s most famous victim, Sharon Tate, told TMZ she received a call from the prison where he was serving nine consecutive life sentences with word that Manson died at 8:13 p.m. Sunday.

On Aug. 9, 1969, Manson directed his followers to kill Sharon Tate, a 26-year-old pregnant movie star, at her California home. The other victims were coffee heiress Abigail Folger, celebrity hair stylist Jay Sebring, Voytek Frykowski and Steven Parent. The following night, Manson ordered his followers to kill Leno LaBianca and his wife, Rosemary. Even though the vicious two-day killing spree took place more than 50 years ago, the murders remain an infatuation in popular culture and is still considered one of the most horrifying murder sprees in American history.

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